Kennewick Fire Officials now say a housefire that took place Wednesday was the accidental result from some weed burning that a homeowner was doing.

The home, located in the 400 block of North Hartford Street, sustained some damage to the side, a back staircase and some of the backside.

 How Fast Did Crews Get There?

No doubt further damage was prevented due to extremely fast response from Kennewick Fire Crews. Authorities say they arrived within 4 minutes after receiving the emergency call.

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After drowning the flames investigators learned the homeowner had been burning some weeds around the outside of the home, and the flames spread quickly to the house. They say it was accidental, but the extremely dry conditions we've been having led to the spread.

Damage was confined to the back stairway, as well as some on the side, and there was minimal smoke damage to the interior.

Officials say until conditions cool, and we get some more precipitation, it is not a good idea to do any kind of burning, residential or otherwise, in our area.

 

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