There's a latte speculation, dare I say some fans are foaming at the mouth, or is it blowing off the froth, as to what sport and in what city is Starbucks about to maybe plug in their drink stopper.

Starbucks has filed the proper paperwork, a trademark application, allowing for stadium or training facility naming rights.

According to Reuters, in a June 2 filing, Starbucks sought approval to use its name in "providing stadium and training facilities for sports and entertainment activities" and "promoting business, sports and entertainment events of others."

Approval could pave an easy path for the world famous Seattle-based coffee conglomerate to join companies such as AT&T, Bank of America, Canadian Tire, FedEx, Oracle, PPG Paints, Target, Toyota and United Airlines whose names already envelop professional stadiums and arenas.

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"Either it is actively looking to make a deal to sponsor a venue, or it wants to protect its right to potentially use its name in that manner," said Ashley Dobbs, a law professor at the University of Richmond in Virginia who specializes in intellectual property.

Naming rights agreements often run for decades and can cost several or tens of millions of dollars annually. The perceived brand loyalty to the building/team/sport must be worth it, else new business players wouldn't be diving in all the time, like that Bezos fellow.

Amazon took a different tack from most corporate sponsors when it named its new arena, built from scratch in downtown Seattle, Climate Pledge Arena.

That building will host the Seattle Kraken expansion team in the National Hockey League, and the Seattle Storm of the Women's National Basketball Association.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office plans by early September to assign a lawyer to review Starbucks' application.

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